Event Type

Non-CGD Event

Payouts for Perils: Making Emergency Aid Better, Faster, and Fairer—Official Side Event to the 2nd High-Level Meeting of the Global Partnership for Effective Development Cooperation

Wednesday, November 30, 2016 - 1:30pm to 2:30pm

This is a non-CGD event and will take place in the Turkana/Impala Rooms at the Kenyatta International Conference Center (KICC) in Nairobi.

Featuring

Alex Palacios, Director of Special Projects, Global Partnership for Education

Pete Vowles, Country Director for Kenya, Department for International Development 

Rowan Douglas, CBE, CEO and Chair, Capital, Science & Policy Practice and Chairman, Willis Research Network, Willis Group

Ginger Turner, Senior Economist & Vice President, Swiss Re 

Moderated by

Owen Barder, Vice President, Senior Fellow & Director for Europe, Center for Global Development 

Millions of people live with the risk of rapid-onset disasters like cyclones, slow-onset disasters like drought, or the threat of conflict. We often wait for these crises to develop to collect money from donors, a delay that costs lives and dramatically raises the costs of responding. As a result, there was an $8 billion gap between what frontline agencies requested to tackle crises in 2015 and what they received. 

We can do better. This high-level panel will present new research conclusions and practical policy actions generated by a high-level working group convened by the Center for Global Development to deliver long-term progress on the Sustainable Development Goals by making emergency aid for disasters faster, more effective, and more fair. Donors usually provide emergency aid on an ad-hoc basis, after disasters strike. By using a simple combination of insurance principles and insurance contracts, we can help vulnerable countries plan ahead, increase ownership, improve resilience, and ultimately save lives, money, and time. This HLM2 event brings together senior leaders of national governments, multilateral institutions, and the global insurance sector to discuss what we can do right now to start solving the problem of emergency aid that is too little and too late.