For Educators

Here you will find CGD work of special interest to development studies educators and their students including syllabuses from courses taught by CGD-affiliated professors as well as slidedecks and multimedia presentations. We have selected from CGD’s hundreds of publications those that provide broad overviews or are otherwise more readily accessible than CGD’s more technical work. Search the materials by topic using the toolbar below and consult our list of development programs at different universities around the world.

Engage with Us! Educators and their students are invited to sign-up for the CGD weekly newsletter and to read and post comments on the Center’s policy blogs. Those who reside in the Washington DC area are invited to sign up for invitations to CGD events, including the Massachusetts Avenue Development Seminars (MADS), our lunchtime academic series. You can also follow CGD on Twitter and Facebook. Students and professors tell us they enjoy listening to our weekly CGD Podcast.

Visit CGD! As the CGD event schedule permits we welcome faculty-led student groups to our offices in Washington for one-hour introductory briefings and Q&A. Faculty interested in arranging such of visit are invited to contact Jeremy Gaines.

Book Purchase and Review Copies: CGD books are available for purchase online through our website or, for bulk orders, through the Hopkins Fulfillment Service, P.O. Box 50370, Baltimore MD 21211-4370. Tel: 1-800-537-5487. For complimentary review or exam copies, please send a note to publications@cgdev.org with details about the potential review or the course you are teaching.

What Now for Zimbabwe? – Todd Moss

History was made in Zimbabwe this week as Robert Mugabe finally agreed to resign the presidency after almost four decades in power. How the country will be governed by new leadership is still very much unknown—yet it is not too early for the international community to start considering how it can offer help to rebuild Zimbabwe’s economy for the benefit of its people. Todd Moss, CGD senior fellow and longtime Zimbabwe watcher, shares specific things that donor governments and international institutions can do. 

US assistance to DRM by agency and instrument, 2015, chart

US assistance to DRM by agency and instrument, 2015

In 2015, the United States delivered $37 million in DRM-focused assistance in 32 countries. USAID contributed the most, disbursing nearly $25 million, followed by MCC ($8.2 million), Treasury ($3.7 million), and the US Trade and Development Agency (a single $8,000 feasibility study in Pakistan).

How Should We Measure Women’s Economic Empowerment?

This event, co-sponsored by CGD, Data2X and IDRC, marks the launch of a new book, Measuring Women’s Economic Empowerment: Lessons from South America. Co-Editor Susana Martinez-Restrepo presents main findings from field work in Colombia, Peru and Uruguay. A panel discussion with some of the leading experts on the topic follows the launch.

The Third Annual Birdsall House Conference on Women: Reproductive Choices to Life Chances

On December 7th, academics, private sector representatives, and policymakers turn to an issue that affects women in rich and poor countries alike: the ability to make informed, voluntary, and autonomous choices about childbearing, and the implications of reproductive choice as a lever to expand women’s economic and life prospects. Until recently, there has been a lack of rigorous empirical evidence on the links between contraceptive access and women’s economic empowerment in low- and middle-income countries. The 2017 Birdsall House Conference features new findings on this relationship alongside existing evidence from the United States.

Rethinking Global Development Policy for the 21st Century

Former Treasury Secretary Lawrence H. Summers' keynote at the Center for Global Development’s annual Global Development Changemaker Dinner. Summers’ speech, which coincides with President Trump’s first visit to China, will address the changing power dynamics among key global leaders and will discuss rethinking global development for the 21st Century.

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