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Chart of analytical validity and reliability by evaluation type

Analytical Validity and Reliability by Evaluation Type (N=37)

We randomly sampled 37 evaluations and applied a standardized assessment approach with two reviewers rating each evaluation. To answer questions about evaluation quality, we used three criteria from the evaluation literature: relevance, validity, and reliability. We constructed four aggregate scores (on a three-point scale) to correspond with these criteria. Overall, we found that most evaluations did not meet social science standards in terms of relevance, validity, and reliability; only a relatively small share of evaluations received a high score.

Chart of sampling validity and reliability by evaluation type

Sampling Validity and Reliability by Evaluation Type (N=37)

We randomly sampled 37 evaluations and applied a standardized assessment approach with two reviewers rating each evaluation. To answer questions about evaluation quality, we used three criteria from the evaluation literature: relevance, validity, and reliability. We constructed four aggregate scores (on a three-point scale) to correspond with these criteria. Overall, we found that most evaluations did not meet social science standards in terms of relevance, validity, and reliability; only a relatively small share of evaluations received a high score.

Summary Scores for Evaluation Quality (N=37)

We randomly sampled 37 evaluations and applied a standardized assessment approach with two reviewers rating each evaluation. To answer questions about evaluation quality, we used three criteria from the evaluation literature: relevance, validity, and reliability. We constructed four aggregate scores (on a three-point scale) to correspond with these criteria. Overall, we found that most evaluations did not meet social science standards in terms of relevance, validity, and reliability; only a relatively small share of evaluations received a high score.

Implementing Clinical Trials during Epidemics: The Ebola Experience

The 2014-2015 Ebola epidemic broke out and affected thousands of people at a time when there were no medicines approved to treat or prevent Ebola. Poor infrastructure, capacity gaps, widespread mistrust, and disagreements over the design and ethical nature of any clinical trials complicated efforts to conduct research on investigational drugs and vaccines. In the wake of the outbreak, the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine tasked a committee with analyzing the clinical trials carried out during the outbreak and developing recommendations to improve the implementation of such trials in the future. In this session, committee members Gerald Keusch and David Peters will discuss findings from the committee’s recently released report and the kind of governance structures that need to be in place for effective international coordination and collaboration.

Global Economic Challenges: A Conversation with IMF Managing Director Christine Lagarde

To coincide with the launch of the IMF’s latest global economic forecasts, and following the G-20 Summit, please join IMF Managing Director Christine Lagarde and CGD president Masood Ahmed for a conversation about challenges and trends ahead for the global economy.

What is the role of the IMF in ensuring inclusive growth and stability in the years to come, and how should it respond to ongoing and emerging issues, including fragile states, rising inequality, technological innovation, and the future of international economic cooperation? The discussion will focus on issues related to the future of the international economy. 

The Future of Family Planning – Rachel Silverman

At a London conference earlier this month, some donors promised generous funding for family planning services in developing countries. At the same time, however, future support from the US is in doubt, and progress towards the FP2020 family planning goals has been extremely limited. Just how much progress have we made, and how far do we have to go? What difference will the new pledges make, and how should they be used? Rachel Silverman, CGD’s assistant director of global health policy, responds to these questions in this week’s podcast. 

Global Agriculture and the American Farmer – CGD Author Kim Elliott

The US agricultural sector is critical to global food security, but many of the policies that currently govern it negatively impact people around the world. In a new book, CGD visiting fellow Kim Elliott argues for practical policy reforms in three areas that are particularly damaging to developing countries: food aid, biofuel subsidies, and antibiotic resistance in livestock. As the US Congress works through a major new farm bill, Elliott joins the CGD Podcast to discuss how the US can reform agricultural policy to achieve better outcomes. 

Corruption and Development: Counting Results not Receipts

Join us to celebrate the launch of Charles Kenny's latest book, Results Not Receipts: Counting the Right Things in Aid and Corruption. This work illustrates a growing problem: an important and justified focus on corruption as a barrier to development has led to policy change in aid agencies that is damaging the potential for aid to deliver results. Donors have treated corruption as an issue they can measure and improve, and from which they can insulate their projects at acceptable costs by controlling processes and monitoring receipts. Results Not Receipts highlights the weak link between donors’ preferred measures of corruption and development outcomes related to our limited ability to measure the problem. It discusses the costs of the standard anti-corruption tools of fiduciary controls and centralized delivery, and it suggests a different approach to tackling the problem of corruption in development: focus on outcomes.

RISE Conference 2017

RISE is a large scale, multi-country research programme developed to answer the question: “How can education systems be reformed to deliver better learning for all?” The objective of this year’s conference is to bring together high profile academics and policy makers to discuss the RISE research agenda. The conference features a range of invited and contributed talks and panels, as well as three sessions focused on our six Country Research Teams (CRTs), including the announcement of our two newest CRTs. The RISE Programme is a collaboration between the Center for Global Development in Washington DC, the Blavatnik School of Government, University of Oxford, and Oxford Policy Management in Oxford, UK, and our CRTs include Tanzania, India, Pakistan, and Vietnam, with two further countries to be announced shortly.

Public-Private Partnerships for Education in the Developing World: Learning Gains, Regulatory Failures, and Other Lessons from Policy Experiments

Public-private partnerships (PPPs) in education that combine public finance to provide free or subsidized access to privately delivered education are expanding in many developing countries, either to increase access where government capacity is limited or to improve learning outcomes—often with limited evidence on their success. This panel brings together experts from the policy and research spheres to review what we know about the design of effective partnerships, the hazards to be avoided, and the frontiers for new research.

Bilateral Economic Assistance, FY2016 to FY2018

Three Lessons for G7 Leaders on Refugees – IRC's David Miliband

The location for this year's G7 Summit, in the Sicilian coastal city of Taormina, is a reminder that Italy's shores are a frontline for refugees making the perilous journey across the Mediterranean from North Africa and the Middle East. For the summit dignitaries who will attend, IRC's David Miliband has some advice on how to address the refugee crisis, which he shares in this edition of the CGD Podcast.

Voices of Experience: A Conversation with Former Treasury Under Secretaries for International Affairs

There is no more valuable time than now, in the early days of the new administration, for a bipartisan exchange among leaders of previous administrationson the formulation and execution of the international economic policies. Join CGD for a conversation with three former Treasury Under Secretaries for International Affairs who played central roles in the Bush II and Obama administrations. The panel discusses the outlook for the global economy, international structural changes and challenges that have emerged since their time in office, the critical issues that will confront the next Under Secretary for International Affairs, and the nature of the job and lessons learned. This event marks the launch of the US Development Policy Initiative’s Voices of Experience series, which will feature discussions with senior officials from past administrations of both parties who shaped international development, economic, and financial policy.

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