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CGD's weekly Podcast, event videos, whiteboard talks, slides, and more.

How Should We Measure Women’s Economic Empowerment?

This event, co-sponsored by CGD, Data2X and IDRC, marks the launch of a new book, Measuring Women’s Economic Empowerment: Lessons from South America. Co-Editor Susana Martinez-Restrepo presents main findings from field work in Colombia, Peru and Uruguay. A panel discussion with some of the leading experts on the topic follows the launch.

The Third Annual Birdsall House Conference on Women: Reproductive Choices to Life Chances

On December 7th, academics, private sector representatives, and policymakers turn to an issue that affects women in rich and poor countries alike: the ability to make informed, voluntary, and autonomous choices about childbearing, and the implications of reproductive choice as a lever to expand women’s economic and life prospects. Until recently, there has been a lack of rigorous empirical evidence on the links between contraceptive access and women’s economic empowerment in low- and middle-income countries. The 2017 Birdsall House Conference features new findings on this relationship alongside existing evidence from the United States.

Rethinking Global Development Policy for the 21st Century

Former Treasury Secretary Lawrence H. Summers' keynote at the Center for Global Development’s annual Global Development Changemaker Dinner. Summers’ speech, which coincides with President Trump’s first visit to China, will address the changing power dynamics among key global leaders and will discuss rethinking global development for the 21st Century.

Digital Revolutions in Public Finance

The IMF Fiscal Affairs Department is launching a new book entitled Digital Revolutions in Public Finance. The event’s panel discussion will center around fundamental questions raised in the book, which makes the case that by transforming how we collect, process, and act on information, it can expand and reshape the way we operate within the frontiers of policymaking, allowing us to do what we do now, but better—and perhaps before too long, even design fiscal policy in new ways. The book also explores the institutional challenges and capacity constraints faced by countries seeking to benefit from the digital revolution, as well as privacy and cybersecurity concerns, which call for greater international cooperation and regulation as information increasingly travels across borders.

What's In, What's Out?

How can countries get optimum health value for their money? What's a health benefits plan and why do countries need them? How should countries decide what's included in their health coverage and what's not? A new CGD book from Amanda Glassman, Ursula Giedion, and Peter C. Smith answers these questions and more.

How Can We End Violence Against Women and Girls? What We Need and What We Know

One in three women around the world has experienced violence in their lifetime. It is the single most common form of violence in the world, but also one of the least analysed and discussed. Evidence shows that fighting violence against women not only addresses horrendous human rights violations and the negative impact on women’s lives and health, but also contributes to countries’ and societies’ sustainable economic, political and social development.

Stitching Together the New Silk Road: How Governments and Institutions Can Make the Belt Road Initiative a Success for Developing Countries

China's Belt Road Initiative aims to connect countries that account for 60 percent of the world's people and 30 percent of global GDP. How can we make sure it produces real and lasting benefits for developing countries that are involved?  At this special mini-summit, co-hosted by CGD, the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, and the Reinventing Bretton Woods Committee, we will bring together global leaders, including governments, multilateral development finance institutions and private banks to identify and discuss practical considerations for BRI partners, as well as challenges and solutions. 

Malaria Control: A Critical Investment for Saving Lives in Africa

This event will serve as an opportunity to discuss and celebrate the launch of a special supplement to the American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene that reports on nine new contributions on the impact of malaria control interventions. Specifically, the articles document the success of various malaria control efforts (including the causal link between malaria intervention scale-up and reductions in malaria morbidity and mortality) and new methods for evaluating the impact of large-scale malaria control programs. Taken together, the articles represent a conceptual and practical framework for planning and executing a new generation of impact evaluations, with possible applications to other health conditions in low-resource settings.

Addressing the Challenges Facing the Global Humanitarian System: A Conversation with Mark Lowcock, the UN’s New Head of Humanitarian Coordination

With more than 145 million people in need of humanitarian assistance, more than 65 million people forcibly displaced, growing risks of climate-driven natural hazards, food insecurity on the rise and four countries struggling to stave off famine, the global humanitarian system faces exceptional challenges. As needs outstrip funding, it is clear that traditional ways of doing business will not suffice. These global crises cannot be addressed without rethinking the link between humanitarian response and development assistance. CGD is delighted to welcome Mark Lowcock, less than two months into his new position as the Emergency Relief Coordinator and Under-Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs. As the UN system’s lead for global relief activities, he is charged with coordinating how humanitarian agencies respond and work together to address global emergencies. After delivering remarks, he will join CGD president Masood Ahmed to discuss successes, challenges, priorities, and reforms for the global humanitarian system in a time of urgent and growing need.

Societal Platforms: Building beyond Aadhaar for Sustainable Development

CGD, in partnership with the World Bank Group, Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, and Omidyar Network, is delighted to host Nandan Nilekani, the founding chairman of UIDAI (Aadhaar), the unique identification system of India, which has enrolled more than a billion people. Nilekani will speak on “Societal Platforms: A Cambrian Approach to Sustainable Development”—how we can distill principles from the unique architecture of Aadhaar to develop new platforms, like EkStep, that can enable people to access an increasingly wide array of transformative services.

Rohingya Crisis: How Can the US and Humanitarian Groups Respond?

Long-simmering conflict in Myanmar’s Rakhine state has exploded in recent weeks, leading to the rapid flight of more than 400,000 members of the country’s Rohingya population into neighboring Bangladesh. The pace of this flight has few precedents in recent history, faster even than the massive flight of Albanians from Kosovo during the 1999 war. The Rohingya are fleeing what appears to be a conscious campaign of violence by Myanmar’s security forces, in what numerous observers argue constitutes a policy of ethnic cleansing. Those who have survived the violence and escaped to Bangladesh face enormous humanitarian needs, and uncertain prospects for ever returning to their now-razed villages and homes. Refugees International, Human Rights Watch, and numerous other agencies are assessing and documenting the violence and have deployed personnel to the border region to interview survivors.

Opportunity for Reform: Four Proposals for Redesigning US Foreign Assistance

With plans for a redesign of the State Department and United States Agency for International Development well under way, this is a critical moment for an informed discussion of the latest reforms proposals that will make US foreign assistance more effective and efficient. Please join us for a bipartisan debate featuring authors of four recent reports that outline options for reform and reorganization of US global development functions. The event will bring to light key areas of consensus and divergence among experts, and will aim to highlight emerging organizing principles for the future of US foreign assistance, potential structural changes to the US global development architecture, and opportunities for building momentum in a fluid political and legislative environment.

Foreign Policy as Migration Policy: Tackling the Complex Drivers of Child Migration from the Northern Triangle

In 2014, unprecedented numbers of children and families began crossing the southern border of the United States, sparking an ongoing debate on what was driving them and how the U.S. should respond. Using data provided by the Department of Homeland Security, new research by Michael Clemens finds the flow of unaccompanied child migrants to the United States has been driven by a complex mix of violence and economic forces. How do these elements interact, and how can foreign policy be a form of migration policy?

Adapting Fiscal Reforms to the Needs of Fragile States

Strengthening institutions is a foremost priority in fragile states and building fiscal capacity is especially important in the effort to exit fragility. In its recent paper Building Fiscal Capacity in Fragile States, the IMF draws on analysis of 39 fragile states and eight country case studies to describe its approach to fiscal reforms in fragile states and to draw lessons going forward. Participants will bring both advisory and policymaker perspectives to the panel discussion.

Women Entrepreneurs: What Really Helps Them Start and Grow Businesses?

Please join a panel of distinguished thought and practice leaders from the World Bank, WeConnect, and the Global Banking Alliance for Women for a discussion of how to formulate a holistic approach to this set of challenges. What does the evidence tell us about the most effective ways to support access to finance, access to skills and networks, and access to markets? And how can interventions best be combined?

Implementing Clinical Trials during Epidemics: The Ebola Experience

The 2014-2015 Ebola epidemic broke out and affected thousands of people at a time when there were no medicines approved to treat or prevent Ebola. Poor infrastructure, capacity gaps, widespread mistrust, and disagreements over the design and ethical nature of any clinical trials complicated efforts to conduct research on investigational drugs and vaccines. In the wake of the outbreak, the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine tasked a committee with analyzing the clinical trials carried out during the outbreak and developing recommendations to improve the implementation of such trials in the future. In this session, committee members Gerald Keusch and David Peters will discuss findings from the committee’s recently released report and the kind of governance structures that need to be in place for effective international coordination and collaboration.

Global Economic Challenges: A Conversation with IMF Managing Director Christine Lagarde

To coincide with the launch of the IMF’s latest global economic forecasts, and following the G-20 Summit, please join IMF Managing Director Christine Lagarde and CGD president Masood Ahmed for a conversation about challenges and trends ahead for the global economy.

What is the role of the IMF in ensuring inclusive growth and stability in the years to come, and how should it respond to ongoing and emerging issues, including fragile states, rising inequality, technological innovation, and the future of international economic cooperation? The discussion will focus on issues related to the future of the international economy. 

Corruption and Development: Counting Results not Receipts

Join us to celebrate the launch of Charles Kenny's latest book, Results Not Receipts: Counting the Right Things in Aid and Corruption. This work illustrates a growing problem: an important and justified focus on corruption as a barrier to development has led to policy change in aid agencies that is damaging the potential for aid to deliver results. Donors have treated corruption as an issue they can measure and improve, and from which they can insulate their projects at acceptable costs by controlling processes and monitoring receipts. Results Not Receipts highlights the weak link between donors’ preferred measures of corruption and development outcomes related to our limited ability to measure the problem. It discusses the costs of the standard anti-corruption tools of fiduciary controls and centralized delivery, and it suggests a different approach to tackling the problem of corruption in development: focus on outcomes.

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