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What Now for Zimbabwe? – Todd Moss

History was made in Zimbabwe this week as Robert Mugabe finally agreed to resign the presidency after almost four decades in power. How the country will be governed by new leadership is still very much unknown—yet it is not too early for the international community to start considering how it can offer help to rebuild Zimbabwe’s economy for the benefit of its people. Todd Moss, CGD senior fellow and longtime Zimbabwe watcher, shares specific things that donor governments and international institutions can do. 

The Conservative Case for OPIC: Harnessing the Private Sector for Development

With cuts to foreign aid on the horizon, the United States, now more than ever, needs to sharpen its tools to operate in a constrained budget environment. Key to this approach is a strong development finance institution that can leverage private investment to achieve development outcomes, as well as create opportunity for American companies abroad—all at less than no cost to the US taxpayer. At this event, Congressman Ted Yoho of Florida addresses the vital role the Overseas Private Investment Corporation plays in US development policy, and discusses how he came to support its mission. An expert panel discusses the conservative rationale behind OPIC, why its critics are wrong, and what can be done to strengthen the institution and leave it better prepared to address future development challenges.

$50 Billion In One Room: How Can Development Finance Institutions Unleash the Private Sector?

We know that private resource flows into the developing world far exceed anything governments might provide in official development assistance and that greater economic growth and jobs are needed to meet individual aspirations. How can DFIs help governments to rethink how they work with the private sector? At this co-hosted event, think tank experts quiz DFI heads about their main challenges and successes in leveraging private capital, and how they can do better.

More Than a Lightbulb

How much energy do the world’s poor need? The current definition of "modern energy access" sets an extremely low bar. A new CGD paper presents five recommendations for a new standard of energy access that would signify meaningful transformation in households and national economies.

Energy Poverty in Sub-Saharan Africa

Sub-Saharan Africa is both broadly and deeply energy poor: only 32 percent of the total population has “modern energy access” using even the minimal IEA definition. Even in urban areas, access averages only 59 percent.

Income Categories and Proposed Energy Categories

Energy use is highly correlated with a country’s income category. No rich country consumes less than 5,000 kWh/person/year; no poor country consumes more than 300 kWh/person/year. Just as countries are categorized as low, lower middle, upper middle, and high income, energy categories could be established for extreme low energy, low energy, middle energy, and high energy , on the basis of annual per capita energy use.

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