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Damages Mainly in Rich Countries vs. Deaths in Poor Ones - 1980-2010

Damages Mainly in Rich Countries vs. Deaths in Poor Ones, 1980-2010

From a financial perspective, disasters appear to have been kind to developing countries. That makes sense: highways in Tokyo, for example, cost more than roads in Sri Lanka. But the costs in terms of human lives are dramatically higher in developing countries. That makes humanitarian emergencies and natural disasters highly regressive—their toll falls disproportionately on the poorest and most vulnerable. 

The Humanitarian Financing Deficit is Growing Quickly

This chart compares agencies’ requests for funding through humanitarian-response plans. Underinvestment in resilience and increasing costs due to late response show up as a rising deficit, as calls on donors’ humanitarian budgets go unmet. Since response plans are filed after crises develop, funding is late almost by design. And it arrives in the straitjacket of annual disbursements, despite the multi-year nature of many crises 

Emergency Aid is Broken: Using Insurance to Make Disasters Dull

Millions of people live with the risk of rapid-onset disasters like cyclones, slow-onset disasters like drought, or the threat of conflict. We often wait for these crises to develop to collect money from donors, a delay that costs lives and dramatically raises the costs of responding. As a result, there was an $8 billion gap between what frontline agencies requested to tackle crises last year and what they received. 

Brexit Breakdown: What Now for Global Development? Podcast with Owen Barder

It’s been three weeks since the UK voted to leave the European Union in the move popularly known as Brexit, and the consequences are still becoming apparent. Senior fellow and director of CGD Europe Owen Barder joins the podcast from London this week to take a balanced look at possibilities for the UK’s future, and consider implications for the country and the developing world. 

Survival Migration: New Models to Address the Global Crisis of Migration and Displacement

The world was caught off-guard by recent mass movements of refugees and migrants from the Middle East and Africa. But this is not one brief storm to be weathered and forgotten. These mass movements will only continue in coming years as conflict, disasters, extreme poverty, and other hardships displace people from their homes. Today the recent rise in 'survival migration' is commonly cited to justify political upheaval and isolationism in both Europe and the United States.

“Google For Doctors”: How the G20 and World Bank Can Help Tackle Antibiotic Resistance – Podcast with Lord Jim O’Neill

The economist who coined the term "BRICS" thinks he has a hot investing tip. In this edition of the CGD podcast, Lord Jim O’Neill of Gatley, a minister in the UK Treasury, tells me that if it costs the world $40 billion over ten years to stop 10 million deaths and “stop the loss of $100 trillion of global GDP, that’s something like a two-and-a-half-thousand percent return.... That seems to me like a pretty good investment.”

Innovation for Development: Why Are We not Getting to Scale?

Development depends on innovation. New ideas, new funding mechanisms and new technologies save and improve lives, from vaccines to solar lamps to Development Impact Bonds. But even if innovations reach a million people, they still fall short of the billion who live in poverty. 

How Multilateral Development Banks Track Gender Equality

Through its Gender and Development Program, CGD is examining donor institutions’ various approaches to promoting gender equality and tracking gender-related results. Join Senior Fellows Mayra Buvinic and Charles Kenny for the next step in this research area: an event focused on how multilateral banks (MDBs) integrate gender across their operations and measure their gender equality-related impacts.

Tackling Antimicrobial Resistance in Developing Countries: The Role of Aid and International Agencies

Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) threatens future growth and prosperity, as well as health. Without global action, the UK's Review on Antimicrobial Resistance, led by Lord Jim O'Neill, estimates that an additional 10 million people will die every year from drug-resistant infections and the global economy will experience a loss of $100 trillion by 2050. The impact from rising drug resistance will be felt worldwide, hitting low- and middle-income countries hardest.

Clear Outcomes Are Key to Effective Humanitarian Work – Podcast with IRC's David Miliband

Not many development organizations can trace their roots to theoretical physics, but it was none other than Albert Einstein who suggested in 1933 that the European-based International Relief Association set up a US branch to help people suffering in Nazi Germany. That branch became the International Rescue Committee (IRC), and today the organization works in more than 40 countries responding to humanitarian crises.

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