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CGD's weekly Podcast, event videos, whiteboard talks, slides, and more.

Societal Platforms: Building beyond Aadhaar for Sustainable Development

CGD, in partnership with the World Bank Group, Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, and Omidyar Network, is delighted to host Nandan Nilekani, the founding chairman of UIDAI (Aadhaar), the unique identification system of India, which has enrolled more than a billion people. Nilekani will speak on “Societal Platforms: A Cambrian Approach to Sustainable Development”—how we can distill principles from the unique architecture of Aadhaar to develop new platforms, like EkStep, that can enable people to access an increasingly wide array of transformative services.

Rohingya Crisis: How Can the US and Humanitarian Groups Respond?

Long-simmering conflict in Myanmar’s Rakhine state has exploded in recent weeks, leading to the rapid flight of more than 400,000 members of the country’s Rohingya population into neighboring Bangladesh. The pace of this flight has few precedents in recent history, faster even than the massive flight of Albanians from Kosovo during the 1999 war. The Rohingya are fleeing what appears to be a conscious campaign of violence by Myanmar’s security forces, in what numerous observers argue constitutes a policy of ethnic cleansing. Those who have survived the violence and escaped to Bangladesh face enormous humanitarian needs, and uncertain prospects for ever returning to their now-razed villages and homes. Refugees International, Human Rights Watch, and numerous other agencies are assessing and documenting the violence and have deployed personnel to the border region to interview survivors.

Opportunity for Reform: Four Proposals for Redesigning US Foreign Assistance

With plans for a redesign of the State Department and United States Agency for International Development well under way, this is a critical moment for an informed discussion of the latest reforms proposals that will make US foreign assistance more effective and efficient. Please join us for a bipartisan debate featuring authors of four recent reports that outline options for reform and reorganization of US global development functions. The event will bring to light key areas of consensus and divergence among experts, and will aim to highlight emerging organizing principles for the future of US foreign assistance, potential structural changes to the US global development architecture, and opportunities for building momentum in a fluid political and legislative environment.

Foreign Policy as Migration Policy: Tackling the Complex Drivers of Child Migration from the Northern Triangle

In 2014, unprecedented numbers of children and families began crossing the southern border of the United States, sparking an ongoing debate on what was driving them and how the U.S. should respond. Using data provided by the Department of Homeland Security, new research by Michael Clemens finds the flow of unaccompanied child migrants to the United States has been driven by a complex mix of violence and economic forces. How do these elements interact, and how can foreign policy be a form of migration policy?

Adapting Fiscal Reforms to the Needs of Fragile States

Strengthening institutions is a foremost priority in fragile states and building fiscal capacity is especially important in the effort to exit fragility. In its recent paper Building Fiscal Capacity in Fragile States, the IMF draws on analysis of 39 fragile states and eight country case studies to describe its approach to fiscal reforms in fragile states and to draw lessons going forward. Participants will bring both advisory and policymaker perspectives to the panel discussion.

Women Entrepreneurs: What Really Helps Them Start and Grow Businesses?

Please join a panel of distinguished thought and practice leaders from the World Bank, WeConnect, and the Global Banking Alliance for Women for a discussion of how to formulate a holistic approach to this set of challenges. What does the evidence tell us about the most effective ways to support access to finance, access to skills and networks, and access to markets? And how can interventions best be combined?

Where Does Your Country Rank on Development? – Ian Mitchell and Anita Käppeli

How well do your country's policies make a positive difference for people in developing nations? That’s the question CGD seeks to answer each year in our Commitment to Development Index (CDI). The team behind the CDI, deputy director of CGD Europe Ian Mitchell and policy analyst Anita Käppeli, join me to discuss why these rankings matter, how countries stack up, and how their scores may be impacted by the shifting political environment.

The Case for IFAD – New President Gilbert Houngbo

Recently the UN warned that 20 million people are facing famine in four countries. How can the International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) help? Gilbert Houngbo, former Prime Minister of Togo and new IFAD president, joins the CGD podcast to discuss IFAD's impact and unique mandate. 

Chart of analytical validity and reliability by evaluation type

Analytical Validity and Reliability by Evaluation Type (N=37)

We randomly sampled 37 evaluations and applied a standardized assessment approach with two reviewers rating each evaluation. To answer questions about evaluation quality, we used three criteria from the evaluation literature: relevance, validity, and reliability. We constructed four aggregate scores (on a three-point scale) to correspond with these criteria. Overall, we found that most evaluations did not meet social science standards in terms of relevance, validity, and reliability; only a relatively small share of evaluations received a high score.

Chart of sampling validity and reliability by evaluation type

Sampling Validity and Reliability by Evaluation Type (N=37)

We randomly sampled 37 evaluations and applied a standardized assessment approach with two reviewers rating each evaluation. To answer questions about evaluation quality, we used three criteria from the evaluation literature: relevance, validity, and reliability. We constructed four aggregate scores (on a three-point scale) to correspond with these criteria. Overall, we found that most evaluations did not meet social science standards in terms of relevance, validity, and reliability; only a relatively small share of evaluations received a high score.

Summary Scores for Evaluation Quality (N=37)

We randomly sampled 37 evaluations and applied a standardized assessment approach with two reviewers rating each evaluation. To answer questions about evaluation quality, we used three criteria from the evaluation literature: relevance, validity, and reliability. We constructed four aggregate scores (on a three-point scale) to correspond with these criteria. Overall, we found that most evaluations did not meet social science standards in terms of relevance, validity, and reliability; only a relatively small share of evaluations received a high score.

Implementing Clinical Trials during Epidemics: The Ebola Experience

The 2014-2015 Ebola epidemic broke out and affected thousands of people at a time when there were no medicines approved to treat or prevent Ebola. Poor infrastructure, capacity gaps, widespread mistrust, and disagreements over the design and ethical nature of any clinical trials complicated efforts to conduct research on investigational drugs and vaccines. In the wake of the outbreak, the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine tasked a committee with analyzing the clinical trials carried out during the outbreak and developing recommendations to improve the implementation of such trials in the future. In this session, committee members Gerald Keusch and David Peters will discuss findings from the committee’s recently released report and the kind of governance structures that need to be in place for effective international coordination and collaboration.

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