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Women Participation in Top 100 Firms that Patent the Most

Women Participation in Top 100 Firms that Patent the Most

Looking across the 100 firms worldwide that patent the most, the variation in women’s participation in innovation is considerable. For the worst-performing seven firms over the 2011-15 period, fewer than 1 in 10 patent applications included a woman inventor.

Implementing Ownership at USAID and MCC: A US Agency-Level Perspective

Hear policymakers from inside and outside the US government discuss their experience applying the principle of country ownership, reflecting on its importance as well as its challenges and trade-offs. Forthcoming research from CGD’s US Development Policy Initiative will review progress made in implementing country ownership, identify the constraints the agencies face, and offer recommendations for better execution of a country ownership approach in practice.

Development Finance Institutions "a Proven Theory of Change" – Heads of OPIC and CDC

OPIC and CDC are among the largest bilateral development finance institutions (DFIs). They are designed to use their funds to attract more private capital into developing markets through, for example, lending or insuring projects against political risk. CEOs Elizabeth Littlefield and Diana Noble discuss why the DFIs' business model is successful and how their institutions can do more. 

This Year in Development

In 2016 on the CGD Podcast, we have discussed some of development's biggest questions: How do we pay for development? How do we measure the sustainable development goals (SDGs)? What should we do about refugees and migrants? And is there life yet in the notion of globalism? In this edition, we bring you highlights of some of those conversations.

New Development Realities in a Changing Global Order

Nancy Birdsall, our founding president, delivers the 2016 Richard Sabot Memorial Lecture, entitled "New Development Realities in a changing Global Order," in her last public event as CGD president. The same globalization that has brought benefits to millions of people in the developing world is seen as not working for many in advanced economies. Yet, despite today’s turbulent politics, globalization is unlikely to be going away. The question for politicians as well as for development economists is how do we make globalization work for people everywhere? What new development realities should shape our approach to that question?

15 Years of Leadership: A Tribute to Nancy Birdsall

Nancy Birdsall will step down as CGD president at the end of December 2016, having led the organization for its first 15 years. In this video, some recent visitors to CGD pay tribute to Nancy's many accomplishments.

Host Country Perceived Utility and Usage of Practices

A new policy paper, The Use and Utility of US Government Approaches to Country Ownership: New Insights from Partner Countries (with AidData co-authors Bradley Parks and Takaaki Masaki), draws upon survey data from government officials and donor staff in 126 developing countries to explore partner country perceptions of 1) how frequently the US government engaged in practices associated both favorably and less favorably with the promotion of country ownership, and 2) how useful each of those practices was. This chart shows that practices that let countries lead tend to be underutilized compared to their perceived utility.

Host Country and Donor Respondents’ Perceived Usefulness of Donor Practices

A new policy paper, The Use and Utility of US Government Approaches to Country Ownership: New Insights from Partner Countries (with AidData co-authors Bradley Parks and Takaaki Masaki), draws upon survey data from government officials and donor staff in 126 developing countries to explore partner country perceptions of 1) how frequently the US government engaged in practices associated both favorably and less favorably with the promotion of country ownership, and 2) how useful each of those practices was. This chart shows that host country respondents and US government staff disagree on which practices are most useful. Most of the practices that are in principle more favorable for the promotion of country ownership (ensuring alignment, providing budget support, paying for outcomes) are those considered most useful by partner country officials. US government staff favor their more common practices (professional training, the provision of technical assistance).

Perceived US Government Use of Country Ownership and Capacity Building Practices

A new policy paper, The Use and Utility of US Government Approaches to Country Ownership: New Insights from Partner Countries (with AidData co-authors Bradley Parks and Takaaki Masaki), draws upon survey data from government officials and donor staff in 126 developing countries to explore partner country perceptions of 1) how frequently the US government engaged in practices associated both favorably and less favorably with the promotion of country ownership, and 2) how useful each of those practices was. This chart shows that the US government relies heavily on professional training and technical assistance (especially international experts), while less frequently adopting practices that make use of in-country systems.

Development and the New Politics – Nancy Birdsall’s Final Podcast as CGD President

“We are going to have global markets still operating,” says Nancy Birdsall confidently, but “the big issue is, will we have a good global politics operating?" And that is indeed the question, as turbulent 2016 draws to a close and 2017 rolls into view. It’s one that will continue to occupy Birdsall, who is stepping down at the end of December as CGD’s first and only president, but will stay on as a senior fellow. The somewhat symbolic occasion of her last podcast as CGD president offers a chance to reflect on what’s changed, and what she hopes development folks will think about over the coming years.

Why Forests? Why Now? A Best Bet for Climate and Development

In uncertain political times, the world needs solutions that enjoy broad-based support. Drawing on more than 20 research papers commissioned over two years, Why Forests? Why Now? demonstrates the disproportionate impact tropical forests can have on climate change mitigation, how the livelihoods of millions of poor people around the world depend on the services they provide, and how consensus has been reached on a framework for international cooperation to conserve them.

A Conversation with USAID Administrator Gayle Smith

As the Obama Administration heads into its final months, USAID Administrator Gayle Smith offers a look at how President Obama and his team chose to address the question of US leadership in global development. She shares her perspective on how USAID and its community of partners are positioned to make progress in an increasingly sharp-edged world.

What Have We Learned? Improving Development Policy Through Impact Evaluation

Despite a host of challenges, hundreds of millions of people across the world have benefited from programs that have been rigorously evaluated and scaled up. Impact evaluation has generated knowledge about poverty and public policy leading to better programs.

At the event, policymakers and evaluators will discuss examples of how evaluation has helped enhance effectiveness, and a panel of evaluation funders will reflect on lessons learned and the way forward. In a time of political transition, we seek to re-energize the movement for increased evidence and value for money in public and aid spending.

Why Forests? Why Now? – Frances Seymour

Preventing dangerous climate change is critical for promoting global development. And saving tropical forests is essential to doing both. CGD senior fellow Frances Seymour, coauthor of a new CGD book, joins me on this week’s podcast to explain why forests are key not only to meeting the objectives of the Paris climate agreement, but also to making progress on the sustainable development goals. 

Britain's Aid Budget: Money Well Spent?

Today we present a slightly unusual edition of the CGD Podcast. We are bringing you highlights of an excellent discussion held at CGD's offices in London which involved, among others, CGD’s Owen Barder. It was a special edition of the Radio 4 program The World Tonight, organized and broadcast by my former colleagues at BBC Radio. The discussion focused on the UK's aid budget.

How Can Finance Ministries Support a Sustainable HIV Response?

Together with some of the country’s leading experts, we explore how a new partnership between the U.S. Treasury Department and PEPFAR will support finance ministries to strengthen the efficiency and effectiveness of the health sector and the fight to end HIV/AIDS. This interactive discussion addresses several questions: Why this partnership? How can Treasury support the global health and HIV agenda? What challenges do finance ministries currently face in their engagement in the health sector? And how do we ensure that finance ministries are integrated into structures to monitor resources and expenditures in HIV and the health sector more broadly?

Can a Swiss Bank Help Deliver the SDGs? – CGD’s Theo Talbot and UBS

“Private sector” appears 18 times in the outcome document from last year’s UN financing for development conference in Addis Ababa—exactly the same number of times as “international cooperation.” In part, this is driven by the financial shortfall traditional donors face in delivering this ambitious agenda, and partly it reflects the different skills our public and private sectors possess. Now, one year into the SDGs, where are those ideas that bring private sector ingenuity and capital into achieving the development goals? In this edition of the CGD Podcast, we'll introduce you to one of them.

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