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CGD's weekly Podcast, event videos, whiteboard talks, slides, and more.

Addressing the Global Refugee Crisis: How We Can Bridge the Gap Between Humanitarian Response and Development Assistance

Of the 21 million refugees around the world today, low- and middle-income countries host more than 80 percent. The strain of refugee flows can threaten stability in these countries, with regional and global consequences. But this is an eminently manageable challenge for the international community. A new report, the culmination of a joint CGD-IRC study group on forced displacement and development, suggests compacts—agreements between host countries and humanitarian and development actors—are a uniquely well-suited approach to address the refugee crisis. Join us for a discussion on how host countries, humanitarian and development agencies, the private sector, and civil society can forge new and stronger partnerships to better meet the needs of refugees and the communities where they seek refuge.

Why and How Change is Coming to the World Bank – New CEO Kristalina Georgieva

Just ahead of the annual World Bank/IMF spring meetings, the Bank’s new CEO, Kristalina Georgieva, spoke with me about a new way of thinking at the 72-year-old institution. The Bank has renewed ambition, she told me, to be a catalyst for massive transformative investment in development. She went on to lay out how the Bank plans to do that in this edition of the CGD Podcast.

The Global Refugee Crisis in Urban Settings: Improving Self-reliance and Reducing Aid Dependence

More than 21 million people around the world are living as refugees. Three-quarters of those do not live in refugee camps, but in urban communities, profoundly altering the social fabric of cities in major host countries. Currently their survival depends on both regular outside assistance from humanitarian agencies and host country governments, and their own support structures such as social network ties. With the average duration of refugee status now more than ten years, this is often an unsustainable solution. Please join the Center for Global Development, in collaboration with the Urban Institute, as we explore how urban refugees can play a greater role in local economies, become more self-reliant and less dependent on outside assistance. What might help them integrate more with host communities? What is the role of social and economic networks?

Latin American Policy Options for Times of Protectionism

A protectionist stance from the US looms large as a policy concern for Latin America, where many countries have chosen a growth model based on increased integration with the rest of the world. What should Latin America’s response be? What are the alternative forms of trade integration and markets creation that the region should explore? What is the role for monetary, fiscal and financial policies? What are the mistakes of the past to be avoided? These are among the key and timely issues that the Latin American Committee on Macroeconomics and Financial Issues (CLAAF) will address. 

The Challenge and Logic of Greater Financing for Africa

At this special event ahead of the World Bank/IMF Spring Meetings, AfDB president Dr Akinwumi Adesina will give keynote remarks and then join an eminent panel to consider the AfDB's future opportunities and challenges. 

The Case for Foreign Assistance — Gates Foundation’s Mark Suzman and CGD Experts

How do you make the case for US foreign aid to an Administration that has proposed slashing it? That was the task for Mark Suzman, Chief Strategy Officer and president of Global Policy and Advocacy for the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, when he recently accompanied Bill Gates to meetings at the White House. In this week's CGD podcast, Suzman gives us two very different versions of the fight against global poverty and disease—the perception and the reality. At an event called Financing the Futurehe joined CGD experts Masood Ahmed, Amanda Glassman, and Antoinette Sayeh to discuss ways the development community can better convey their results. 

Key Destinations of Foreign Assistance, 2000-2015

Key Destinations of Foreign Assistance, 2000-2015

Increases in foreign aid spending—including both military and economic assistance—are not merely a phenomenon of the past eight years. Foreign aid spending increased under the administrations of both Presidents George W. Bush and Barack Obama, largely due to increases in funding to Afghanistan and Iraq. Beyond these three areas, growth in foreign aid spending has been relatively modest.

International Affairs Subfunctions as a Percentage of Total Outlays, 2000-2015

It only takes a quick look at the numbers to see that if your chief goal is to bolster defense spending—as President Trump has suggested his is—even deep cuts to foreign aid programs will be of little help. Together, the cuts proposed to the State Department and USAID amount to less than 3 percent of the defense budget.

What Do the Trump Administration's Budget Cuts Mean—and What Do They Mask? – Scott Morris and Amanda Glassman

The headline figure revealed in the "skinny budget" was 28.4 percent cuts to the State Department, USAID, and international programs. When other areas of spending directly relevant to development are considered, the actual level of cuts is over 30 percent. What do these cuts mean for the people most affected and for America’s role as a global development leader? CGD’s Scott Morris and Amanda Glassman weigh in.

Financing the Future: A Conversation with Mark Suzman

In the current political and economic climate, donor governments are under pressure to reduce and spend foreign aid budgets as efficiently and effectively as possible. Aid remains a critical driver of progress. Yet at the same time, aid is increasingly NOT how the world pays for development; even the annual total of around $160 billion in overseas development assistance (ODA) represents a small and declining share of all global development finance. Private investment flows and developing countries' own public resources dwarf ODA. And while organizations like the World Bank and the UN still have top billing, commitment to their core missions appears to be weakening and regional alternatives are on the rise. Given these considerations, what is the future of development finance?

FY2016 Enacted and FY2018 "Skinny Budget" Request

Funding areas are divided into those that are explicitly cut in the skinny budget, those that are not specified in the skinny budget and thus vulnerable to cuts, and those that appear to be less vulnerable based on the skinny budget.

Cutting Foreign Aid? Expert Perspectives on US Investment in International Development

While still a work in progress, the Trump Administration’s first budget request to Congress is expected to contain deep cuts to the US foreign affairs budget. What would substantial funding reductions mean for US efforts to advance global development and for US interests more broadly? What does the evidence tell us about US investments in foreign aid? How can the administration and Congress work to ensure the best use of assistance dollars?

“Poverty is a Form of Violence” – Reema Nanavaty

In India, 94% of women in the labor force are in the unorganized sector. Their work is generally unrecognized and they often receive no regular salary or workplace benefits. Reema Nanavaty, Secretary General of India’s largest women's trade union SEWA, discusses why officially recognizing these women as workers could benefit not only their families but India as a whole.

The Tech Revolution: Can Development Policy Keep Up? – Raj Kumar of Devex

Viral videos, crowdsourced donations, digital cash transfers for refugees—what opportunities do digital technologies present for development, and how can those of us working on policy innovation make better use of them? Mobile phones were a good start, Devex's Raj Kumar says, but we could be doing a lot more.

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