Tag: Banks

 

Can Technology Solve the De-risking Problem?

Blog Post

In recent years, regulators have raised their expectations for what counts as adequate AML/CFT compliance. At the same time, they have cracked down on institutions that have fallen short. While arguably necessary, this more stringent enforcement has produced some unintended side effects. In particular, it has put pressure on banks’ ability and willingness to deliver certain types of services, notably correspondent banking services.

The G20’s Commitment to Basel III: How will Emerging Markets be Affected? A New CGD Working Group Investigates

Blog Post

CGD is establishing a high-level Working Group, composed of leading experts on Basel III and economic development, that will identify challenges for emerging markets’ financial stability and development derived from the global implementation of Basel III. Effective and appropriate implementation of Basel III’s recommendations could make a huge contribution to global financial resilience with the attendant benefits for development progress. The G20’s commitment on this issue is welcome.

Stay tuned for more on our Working Group’s progress in the coming months.

Financial Stability Board Echoes CGD Finding on Decline in Correspondent Banking

Blog Post

The Financial Stability Board's long-awaited report finds that the number of active CBRs has declined by 6 percent since 2011 and has continued through 2016, affecting all regions and major international currencies. The analysis suggests that small economies are among the most affected by CBR withdrawal. The bottom line: the decline of correspondent banking relationships, especially with smaller and poorer countries, remains an important policy issue.

Publications

Regulatory pressure on international banks to fight money laundering (ML) and terrorist financing (TF) increased substantially in the past decade. We find countries that have been added to a high-risk greylist face up to a 10% decline in the number of cross border payments received from other jurisdictions, but no change in the number sent. We also find that a greylisted country is more likely to see a decline in payments from other countries with weak AML/CFT institutions. We find limited evidence that these effects manifest in cross border trade or other flows. Given that countries that are placed on these lists tend to be poorer on average, these impacts are likely to be more strongly felt in developing countries.

Progress Towards Reducing the Unintended Consequences of Anti-Money Laundering Policies for Poor Countries

Blog Post

Last November, we released a report on the unintended consequences of anti-money laundering policies for poor countries that focused on remittances, corresponding banking, and the delivery of humanitarian aid. Today, we are pleased to report progress towards reducing the negative, unintended consequences of anti-money laundering (AML) regulation, despite the shadow cast on the international development community by Brexit. One significant policy change from the Financial Action Task Force (FATF) and three new reports give us reasons to celebrate a little, even when there is much work to be done.