Ideas to Action:

Independent research for global prosperity

Tag: Private Investment

 

graph compares median private capital inflow/GDP ratios over time for LICs, lower-middle-income countries (LMICs), and upper-middle-income countries (UMICs

Three Surprises about Private Capital Flows to Low-Income Countries

The formidable challenge of financing the Sustainable Development Goals has focused attention on the role of private capital in filling huge finance gaps. But for low-income countries (LICs), which receive only about 5 percent of total cross-border private capital flows to developing countries, there is little confidence that external private capital will make a significant contribution.

2013 World Bank Group / Fund Annual Meetings. 2013 Development Committee. Photo By: Eugene Salazar / World Bank

What CGD Experts are Watching at This Year’s World Bank/IMF Meetings in Bali

Why should countries invest in human capital? As emerging technologies impact economies and societies, how can we ensure that the most vulnerable are protected? Who will step up to finance the SDGs? Next week’s Annual Meetings of the World Bank and the IMF will convene 13,000 global policymakers, private sector executives, academics, and civil society members in Bali, Indonesia as they work to address these questions and more.

Figure 1: Predicted probability of private investment

The Elusive Quest for Additionality

After toiling away for decades in relative obscurity, DFIs have found themselves thrust into the limelight and told to transform “billions to trillions,” to fill the yawning SDG financing gap.

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DFIs are frequently asked to demonstrate their additionality—meaning that they make investments that the private sector would not—but what evidence of additionality would look like is rarely articulated. This paper examines potential quantitative and qualitative evidence.

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Rethinking the Infrastructure Gap in the Poorest Countries

A recent blog post by Ricardo Hausmann caught my eye because it addresses issues that I’ll be focusing on during my visiting fellowship here at the Center for Global Development. Hausmann—a former Venezuelan minister of planning—discusses the difficulty of closing the infrastructure gap in developing countries, and highlights the dilemma of whether governments should finance infrastructure projects through public-private partnerships or through their national budgets. He’s right about the dilemma, but his solution isn’t workable for fragile and low-income countries where infrastructure needs are greatest.

More Mobilization and Impact: Adapting MDB Private Finance Models

There is an urgent need to change PSW business models to maintain their financial sustainability while doing much better on mobilization and development impact. Two factors are critical for meeting this challenge: enhanced risk management capability and greater flexibility regarding risk-adjusted returns.

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MDB private sector operations or windows (PSWs) are essential actors in mobilizing private finance for development, but their mobilization track record to date falls far short of a meaningful contribution to annual SDG financing gaps in the trillions

Stock photo of various currencies

Announcing an International Conference on Blended Development Finance and the New Industrial Policy

CGD and the Centre for Finance and Development are teaming up to bring together international finance practitioners who are thinking about how to marry public and private international financing for development (so-called blended finance) and researchers who are rethinking government strategies to encourage private activity in sectors viewed as key to economic development (known as the new industrial policy).

The Pitfalls of Leverage Targets

Since the 2015 financing for development agreement, donor governments and their development finance institutions have all been singing from the same hymn sheet: we must do more to mobilize private investment. Here I will argue that setting leverage targets in isolation might not get us what we want: more investment in developing countries. Overall investment volumes in chosen markets may make a better target, but any incentives must be soft to minimize the temptation to put public money where it is not needed.

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